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Fauna & Flora International and ResourceAfrica teamed up to create "SMS Communities" a system for relaying important information to community members living near South Africa's Kruger National Park. The aim was that ultimately the system could be used to warn residents and Park staff via SMS of wild animals that may be dangerously close; as well as keeping local communities informed about park management meetings, job opportunities and social events.
As part of its Freedom from HIV/AIDS project, ZMQ Software Systems designed four mobile games to educate the public about HIV/AIDS and prevention measures. The project was launched in India and is now expanding to Africa.
ShareIdeas.org is an online community and a wiki for sharing ideas on how to use mobile communications for social and environmental benefits. ShareIdeas.org was created with support from Nokia and Vodafone, but belongs to the growing global network of individuals and organizations that use this virtual gathering place to communicate - and collaborate.
In October 2005, the Annenberg Research Network on International Communication (ARNIC) at the University of Southern California (USA) held a workshop - "Wireless Communication and Development: A Global Perspective" - as part of a multi-disciplinary effort to study the emergence of new communication infrastructures, examine the transformation of government policies and communication patterns, and analyse the social and economic consequences.
This article from the Daily Times of Pakistan focuses on mobile telephone use among developing countries. According to the author, the potential development implications of increased access to communications products being made available in economically poor countries "can be vital for a range of social development processes." Using examples from Africa and South Asia, the article shows that the "growing profusion of cell phones can have a direct impact on the lives of [economically] poor people," for example, changing the lives of economically poor women whose personal mobility is constrained by socio-cultural barriers.
This article is written by Seán Ó Siochrú in response to The Economist's article entitled "The Real Digital Diversity." In that article, a premise is made that mobile phones can bridge the digital divide. Ó Siochrú contends that this is not the full story. He faults The Economist article for making generalisations about solutions that he describes as one-size-fits-all in respect to technologies (GSM mobile), to applications (telephones), and to regulatory approaches (liberalisation and competition).
In October 2005, the Annenberg Research Network on International Communication (ARNIC) at the University of Southern California (USA) held a workshop - "Wireless Communication and Development: A Global Perspective" - as part of a multi-disciplinary effort to study the emergence of new communication infrastructures, examine the transformation of government policies and communication patterns, and analyse the social and economic consequences.
This article is written by Seán Ó Siochrú in response to The Economist's article entitled "The Real Digital Diversity." In that article, a premise is made that mobile phones can bridge the digital divide. Ó Siochrú contends that this is not the full story. He faults The Economist article for making generalisations about solutions that he describes as one-size-fits-all in respect to technologies (GSM mobile), to applications (telephones), and to regulatory approaches (liberalisation and competition).
How can the power and popularity of the mobile phone be harnessed to improve access to financial networks? According to this article in the Post Chronicle, mobile phones are becoming commonplace - even in some of the remotest parts of the world. In wealthier countries, such developments as a multi-functioning phone complete with built-in camera, internet access, and MP3 player are "no longer novel." In early June 2006, mobile giant Nokia predicted that demand for handsets that act more as mobile computers than phones will increase over the next few years.
mGovernment   |   Noticias

Mobile 2007 report (18-06-07)

According to this report from ENTER [Centro de Análisis de la Sociedad de la Información y las Telecommunicaciones], the number of mobile customers throughout the world reached 2.6 billion by the end of 2006, with two-thirds of these customers in a developing country (compared with 50% at the end of 2003). Meanwhile, fixed telephony continues along the downward trend that started in 2002; in 2005, there was a decrease of 2.1% in value terms in the world market as a whole.
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